Holiday Concerts-French Quarter & Treme

Thanks to local hotel favs Le Richelieu for making this list:

St. Louis Cathedral Concerts
The St. Louis Cathedral concerts, produced by French Quarter Festivals, Inc. as part of Christmas New Orleans Style, generally run for an hour, from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. The concerts are open to the public and donations are welcome to help fund the cost of the series.
November 17, 2016 (6:30PM) The Jones Sisters (Gospel)
November 20, 2016 Jean-Baptiste Monnot (Classical)
December 1, 2016 Joe Lastie’s Family Gospel (Gospel)
December 4, 2016 Charmaine Neville (Jazz/R & B)
December 5, 2016 Rachel Van Voorhees (Harp/Classical)
December 6, 2016 Sunpie and the Louisiana Sunspots (Zydeco)
December 8, 2016 Greater St. Stephen Mass (Choir Gospel)
December 11, 2016 Tim Laughlin (Jazz)
December 12, 2016 Alexis & the Samurai w/ Guests (Pop/Folk)
December 13, 2016 Irma Thomas Sings Gospel (Gospel)
December 14, 2016 Tony Green and Gypsy Jazz (Gypsy Jazz)
December 15, 2016 Christmas Organ Spectacular w/ Emmanuel Arakélian (Classical)
December 18, 2016 (5:30) St. Louis Cathedral Annual Concert

St. Augustine Catholic Church Concerts
St Augustine is the oldest African-American Catholic church in the United States and is located at 1210 Gov. Nicholls Street in the historic Treme neighborhood. Free secure parking is available in the church’s parking lot – enter from Henriette Delille Street.

The St. Augustine Church holiday concerts, produced by French Quarter Festivals, Inc. as part of Christmas New Orleans Style, run for an hour, from 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. The concerts are free and open to the public and donations are welcome to help fund the cost of the series.
December 3, 2016 James Andrews(Jazz)
December 10, 2016 Shades of Praise (Gospel)
December 17, 2016 Original Tuxedo Jazz Band

Macaroni Factory

There are some eras of the French Quarter that are better understood than others. The 16-month history of the city under the Confederacy is beloved by many for example (likely for more divisive reasons), or how we dote on the later French Republic era versus the chaotic, earlier French colonial era. The Sicilian era is certainly well-loved but it lacks formal sites or places to stop and view its history. Yet Sicilians have had such an enormous impact on New Orleans, including the growth of truck vending, food production, corner store proliferation and attention to certain saints holidays.

This article is a lovely account of one such family history in the French Quarter.

Source: A skeptic finds her family’s roots in an old macaroni factory

WATCHING PEOPLE MOURN AN AMERICA THAT NEVER WAS

I found this one of the best things I’ve read. Part of that is because it reminds me of the truth in the fractured, violent and yet sweet place that I call home. It reminds me that we can all show up for the Saints games, but not all of us get to hang out in the fancy bars afterward without sidelong glances being thrown. That Mardi Gras is a street thing, but some of those krewes are locked up tight.  Or, that job we disdain or the apartment we moan about is not open to anyone and everyone. And the other part of it is that Ruffin writes simply and poignantly and with fire in his veins.

 

We would have laughed in the face of your naïveté if we didn’t like you so much. It was sweet the way your eyes widened as your understanding of what we saw in our everyday lives played across your face. You were dismayed that your own blood didn’t care about the lofty constitutional precepts of justice and the pursuit of happiness for all. Your recognition of our separateness saddened us. It was like watching a child learn the truth about Santa Claus.

 

Maurice Ruffin’s piece

New Orleans fiction submissions encouraged

OPEN CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS! SPREAD THE WORD!

 

Crescent City Books is pleased to announce our new imprint, CCB. We (with sister store Commonwealth Books) have published a decade’s worth of acclaimed international poetry. We’re now venturing into prose, specifically that set in New Orleans. Not “Southern lit” or folky fiction, but the dual lens of a microscope on New Orleans and a telescope on the rest of the world. We’re looking for fresh style and voice.
Completed novels (again, only those set in New Orleans) may be submitted to ccbsubmissions@gmail.com Body of email should include query/brief bio/1st chapter. Word file or PDF of entire novel should be attached.

Connect.the.dots.

I’m sorely disappointed in how many French Quarter/CBD business and property owners have outlawed bike parking on their gallery poles and are now threatening to cut or pour glue in locks that do park there. This is an assault on those of us who do our best to not over use heavy vehicles that damage those same buildings, as well as those who travel to the Qtr to work at low-paying jobs in service to all of us. Many riders start or finish their work day while most of us are in bed and then are being forced to walk blocks to find a safe place to lock their bicycle, further endangering their safety. Isn’t it better to have constant “eyes on the street” than a bike-free post for someone else to leave their discarded go cup balanced on or to pee against? What’s more is that few of those who have outlawed parking at their building do anything to get more racks or try to find ways to share the streets with us. And many of those here who have needlessly declared war on their human-powered neighbors are tsk-tsking over the actions of the government against DAPL protesters – how will we actually have a future that requires less of these actions you ask? Well, maybe by encouraging walkable/bikeable streets and using public transportation when necessary. I am very saddened by this turn of events among my neighbors.  And no, I do not need nor will allow any bashing of bicyclists here. Of course there are those among us who don’t move their bikes every 10 hours (so precious eyes don’t have to look upon someone else’s property touching theirs) or who ride in such a way as to make it harder for others, but the majority of us who do our best to be fair and careful are the ones who really suffer with these punitive actions. Design your actions in that direction instead. 

Celebrate the birthday of the Baroness Pontalba

How funny- Maybe I should ask the Baroness a few questions since I am researching the commercial history of Jackson Square and of the Pontalbas. (And I wonder if the Grand Duchess will come back in town for this?)

 

At the Upper Pontalba Building, Jackson Square
THURSDAY, November 3th 5-7 p.m. 500 block of St. Peter Street
Meet the Baroness—Shop—Eat Cake—Enjoy Opera

A Celebration of the Life of Micaela Leonarda Antonia Almonester y Rojas, Baroness de Pontalba (Born: November 6, 1795, New Orleans, LA; Died: April 20, 1874, Paris, France). The Baroness Pontalba is the namesake of and responsible for the design, development, and construction of the Pontalba buildings on Jackson Square, the oldest continually rented apartment buildings in the United States. The Upper Pontalba Building is managed by the French Market Corporation and is part of the French Market District.

***Spend $25 in one of the participating Shops at the Upper Pontalba on Saint Peter Street and get a raffle ticket to win items from the Shops at the Upper Pontalba! You must be present to win. Raffles will be at 5:30 p.m., 6:15 p.m. and 6:45 p.m. **

Event Schedule:

Enjoy extended shop hours, retail specials, live opera, historical characters in costume, and a chance to meet Dr. Christina Vella, the author of the definitive biography of the Baroness Pontalba, “INTIMATE ENEMIES”
Signed Paperback copies of the book will be for sale at Muse at 532 St. Peter Street throughout the evening
5:00-7:00 p.m. Louisiana History Alive presents The Baroness Pontalba in person!
5:30 p.m. Raffle #1. Spend $25 in one of the participating Shops at the Upper Pontalba on Saint Peter Street and get a raffle ticket to win items from the Shops at the Upper Pontalba! You must be present to win.
6:15 p.m. Raffle #2!
5:45-6:30 p.m. New Orleans Opera Association performs from a balcony above the Shops at the Upper Pontalba
6:00-7:00 p.m. Book signing by Christina Vella, author of Intimate Enemies: The Two Worlds of Baroness de Pontalba
6:30 p.m. Happy Birthday, Baroness! Join us in singing Happy Birthday and sharing cake
6:45 p.m. Raffle #3! Spend $25 in one of the participating Shops at the Upper Pontalba on Saint Peter Street and get a raffle ticket to win items from the Shops at the Upper Pontalba! You must be present to win.