89th Pirate’s Alley Art show April 6, 7

Apr 6- Apr 7
What:  an art event featuring exciting artwork by regional artists ,plus an opening parade, food and beverages for purchase, and painting demonstrations by some members of the association.

Visit noartassoc.org, or contact Wanda at noartassoc@yahoo.com for a prospectus, if you want to be an artist- participant.

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New Orleans Artists Take on Real Estate’s Loaded Terms

Next City is the best site to learn about truly innovative grassroots work happening in cities. I depend on it almost daily to bring me to new stories and its analysis too. This story, for example, is about something happening in my own city that I knew nothing about…

 

All these different auctions that are means of trying to inscribe monetary value to a property that has somehow failed,” says Imani Jacqueline Brown, a Blights Out co-founder who grew up in New Orleans. “First as shelter because no one is living in it, it’s not helping anyone. And has failed secondarily in its function as a financial instrument. The New Orleans that I know and that I grew up in values property and values neighborhoods not as an investment, not as an asset class for speculation, not as a starter home that you’ll then abandon and move onto something bigger and better and more prefab, but you value it for its ability as a social asset and cultural asset, as a cultural and community anchor…

….Blights Out found a third house, adjacent to Ooh Poo Pah Doo Bar. Before the whole group could look at the property together, the city demolished it. Four years after starting their search, the collective is now trying to purchase the vacant lot where it once stood, plus another across the street. If the deal goes through, they’ll use the lots to create semipermanent outdoor structures for gathering spaces, perhaps eventually building a house from scratch. It’s not ideal, but they don’t see another option. “The window to get what we wanted is closing,” says Eversley….

 

How do you keep art from being complicit in gentrification? You make it completely uncommodifiable. You make it completely unpalatable to development. You make it so development won’t even want to associate with it, let alone co-opt it.

There’s no win. It’s a small win,” she concedes. “But ultimately the city is going to be gentrified. We’re just trying to stem the bleeding at this point.

New Orleans Artists Take on Real Estate’s Loaded Terms – Next City

Lavender Interview 

A perceptive and sensitive interview with New Orleans poet/publisher Bill Lavender.

What’s involved here is the very same bias that Zizek speaks of in “The Subject Supposed to Loot and Rape,” his article on the national perception of New Orleans in the wake of Katrina. Or, as Deleuze put it, “If you’re trapped in the dream of the Other, you’re fucked.” We in the South have been trapped in some New Yorker’s dream for some time now. The stereotype has actually gotten worse, I think, in recent times, as the cultural hegemony of New York and California have been eroding and they scramble to bolster the pretense that they still matter…

…The New Orleans scene has waxed and waned since I’ve been involved in it, and the political and generally extra-aesthetic forces that have shaped it would make a very interesting study…. The reason, I think, that MFA programs have flourished to the point of overpopulation of late is that they have attempted to recreate real artistic movements, with the comradery and passion and competitiveness of a real scene but within the artificial environment of the university. MFA programs represent the disneyfication of writing. They are simulacra of real artistic discovery, available only with a paid ticket. It isn’t that nothing good goes on in them (I’ve taught in and directed one myself), but a real movement can only happen outside this system, in the political and economic “real world.”

Source: Lavender Ink Interview | Jacket2