Bicycling while Black?

This gentleman received this ticket at 4 am in the morning over on Gentilly. This is absolutely shameful and MUST result in action by our city government to reduce this type of harassment. The stated costs of each infraction are also shocking and need to be reduced to a warning for a convicted first offense, and then a minimal charge for later charges.
Education about what is required by cyclists would be great; unlike auto drivers, there is no required training for any rider of a bike and many of these rules are simply not known to riders.
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Portage Bike Roll 2018

The Historic New Orleans Collection is offering free bicycle tours with A Bicycle Named Desire every Wednesday and Sunday through June 3 as part of the upcoming exhibition Art of the City: Postmodern to Post-Katrina, presented by The Helis Foundation.
The six-mile trip highlights the public art, history, and architecture along the Esplanade corridor, starting in the Marigny, through Tremé, down Esplanade to City Park, then looping back to finish in the French Quarter at THNOC, 533 Royal Street. There, guests will be able to preview some of the works that will be on view in Art of the City when THNOC’s new exhibition center opens in fall 2018. That preview also opens today at 533 Royal Street, with a special event at 6 p.m. featuring UK artist Robin Reynolds, whose work New Orleans: Between Heaven and Hell anchors the display.
Maps for self-guided tours are now available at THNOC and A Bicycle Named Desire, 632 Elysian Fields Avenue. The free guided tours are offered Wednesdays and Sundays at 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. May 9–June 3. The afternoon tour on June 3 will take place by bus. Registration is required for all guided tours. Participants must be 16+ years old and capable of strenuous physical activity and a six-mile bike ride. For more information, contact A Bicycle Named Desire at abicyclenameddesire@gmail.com or (504) 345-8966.

 

Traffic Study for FQ users

The fact that questions 10 and 11  require you to answer as preferring one of the options and did not included a None of the Above choice means this is a poorly worded survey which will skew the results.

I added this to the last text question:

These 2 questions (10 and 11) REQUIRED an answer which is unfair and should have included a none of the above answer. My response should not be recorded as I do not prefer any of those options but the questions were required to be answered in order for my survey to be saved. Please count them as none of the above.

_______________________________________________________________________________

Please find below a link to the French Quarter Traffic Study Survey, which is being conducted as part of the City of New Orleans Citywide Public Safety Improvements plan.

Specifically, the French Quarter Traffic Study is focused on the transportation, traffic and delivery issues associated with the proposed changes to vehicular traffic flow on Bourbon Street.

There is one survey for French Quarter residents and one survey for French Quarter business owners.

 Why – We are administering this survey to ensure that residents and businesses across the French Quarter have an opportunity to participate and inform the Traffic Study.
 Time – The survey will take approximately 10 minutes to complete.
 Privacy – Your privacy will be protected; only the City and its contractor will have access to the raw survey data.
 Deadline – The survey should be completed by close of business on Friday, April 28, 2017.

Participate in the Survey for Residents: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FQ_Reside…
Participate in the Survey for Businesses: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FQ_Busine…

If you do not have access to a computer, please call 504.658.ROAD for assistance with participating in the survey.

We appreciate your willingness to engage in this process. Should you have any questions, you may direct them to 504.658.ROAD or send e-mail to roadwork@nola.gov.

Connect.the.dots.

I’m sorely disappointed in how many French Quarter/CBD business and property owners have outlawed bike parking on their gallery poles and are now threatening to cut or pour glue in locks that do park there. This is an assault on those of us who do our best to not over use heavy vehicles that damage those same buildings, as well as those who travel to the Qtr to work at low-paying jobs in service to all of us. Many riders start or finish their work day while most of us are in bed and then are being forced to walk blocks to find a safe place to lock their bicycle, further endangering their safety. Isn’t it better to have constant “eyes on the street” than a bike-free post for someone else to leave their discarded go cup balanced on or to pee against? What’s more is that few of those who have outlawed parking at their building do anything to get more racks or try to find ways to share the streets with us. And many of those here who have needlessly declared war on their human-powered neighbors are tsk-tsking over the actions of the government against DAPL protesters – how will we actually have a future that requires less of these actions you ask? Well, maybe by encouraging walkable/bikeable streets and using public transportation when necessary. I am very saddened by this turn of events among my neighbors.  And no, I do not need nor will allow any bashing of bicyclists here. Of course there are those among us who don’t move their bikes every 10 hours (so precious eyes don’t have to look upon someone else’s property touching theirs) or who ride in such a way as to make it harder for others, but the majority of us who do our best to be fair and careful are the ones who really suffer with these punitive actions. Design your actions in that direction instead. 

Walking over my own grave

Years ago I went to see the Coppola movie “Peggy Sue Got Married” with my dearest friend Roger. The movie was not meaningful to me (beyond being beautifully stylish), but upon getting to the car,  Roger (who was my mother’s age), looked at me with deep awe and said, “That was like walking over my own grave.” I have pondered that statement often; I assume he meant he had the sensation of having lived the reality being portrayed.

Tonight, I had an inkling of what he meant. I went to the Bike Easy annual party and membership event and remembered being in the middle of this work and yet had the sense that it was all new and far off.

I saw faces from 15 years ago when we began to organize the lane system with the city proper and also remembered those elders who were not there who had been working on bike advocacy and education for a generation or more before us. I felt both invisible and very visible at the same time. I also heard and saw the new energy around expanded advocacy for all mobility issues including the very cool folks of StolenBikesNola who are happy to get support for their work if you are so inclined…

I drank some beer, listened and remembered different issues and faces. And finally, decided I was grateful to have longevity in organizing and grateful for those who keep the work moving forward.

 

 

 

 

New Study Confirms: “Share The Road” Is a Problem 

In sharp contrast to the complete uselessness of “Share The Road”, survey respondents who were shown the “Bicycle May Use Full Lane” sign showed uniformly high understanding of permissible cyclist lane positioning and appropriate safe passing behavior for motorists.

“Comprehension of the familiar “Share the Road” signage as a statement of bicyclists’ roadway rights has been challenged, based on arguments that it is ambiguous, imprecise, frequently misinterpreted, and not designed for that purpose…In fact, the US state of Delaware discontinued use of the “Share the Road” plaque in November, 2013.

Source: New Study Confirms: “Share The Road” Is a Problem | Bike Delaware Inc.