Mardi Gras: “We Were the Parade”

Click the link below from Country Roads Magazine to catch a glimpse of five different walking traditions from last year’s festivities. This excerpt is from Big Queen (“Reesie”) Cherice Harrison-Nelson of the Guardians of the Flame Maroon Society, one of the legendary Harrison clan who has done so much to keep Mardi Gras Indian traditions visible:

The ceremony commemorates our past and our future as the Guardians of the Flame Maroon Society. We humbly share the universal flame of humanity, peace, and light to carry forth every day. The masking tradition may be associated with a Christian holiday and refer to Native Americans, but, so far as I can tell, it’s the most vibrant existing West African tradition in the New World. 

https://countryroadsmagazine.com/travel/mardi-gras-on-foot/?fbclid=IwAR1iV_o6rTzm1hRjtHPBIxkaVcOnz-gCDbR3ZtSbIhhIuYKoaCSwu14aTIs

Golden Age of New Orleans Literature with Nancy Dixon

My pal and one of favorite storytellers and literary critics, Dr. Nancy Dixon was on Susan Larson’s Tricentennial Reading List this week. This whole series by Susan is magnificent. But start with “DoctorDix”

Nancy Dixon with Susan Larson

 

Home page of series

 

 

L’Union, New Orleans Tribune honored

The Louisiana Creole Research Association will host a forum and unveiling of a new historic marker this weekend for L’Union (1862-1864), the South’s first Black newspaper, and the New Orleans Tribune (1864-1869), America’s first Black daily paper.

The forum takes place this Saturday, June 16 from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.at the Williams Research Center at the Historic New Orleans Collection, 410 Chartres Street. The marker unveiling will immediately follow the forum, and the event is free and open to the public.

From The Advocate article:

In response, Roudanez formed L’Union with his older brother, Jean Baptiste Roudanez, as publisher and Paul Trevigne as the paper’s first editor.

As soon as L’Union began publishing, the three men faced repeated threats of arson and death, but in response, they decided to expand their audience by publishing the daily Tribune.

As the paper editorialized in 1869, its goal was not to be a journal dedicated merely to beautiful prose. “We plead for equality not as philosophers (who) in their closet write beautiful essays about abstract principles,” the editorial said. “We are seeking to throw off a tremendous load which has been our inheritance for centuries. With us, it is a reality and no abstraction.

Found at 527 Conti Street (at Bevolo Gas & Electric Lights showroom building)