Meet Dutch Alley letterpress printer, John Fitzgerald

Here’s a great interview with my pal, letterpress printer John Fitzgerald. He has a shop over on St. Bernard Ave, but his stuff is easily found at the local artist co-op Dutch Alley which is at Dumaine at the river levee in the French Market. I am a fan as he knows and he has gifted me with many of his best pieces, and I have purchased many more. I definitely look forward to getting one of his Mardi Gras handouts each year. Here is one, along with 2 other pieces of his also on my wall, along with the Banksy, Harry Lee magnet, and General Leia.

IMG_0236.JPGIMG_0234 (1).JPG

 

 

Golden French Quarter

From Historic New Orleans Collection, a link below to some lovely sketches by local artist Rolland Golden. By the way, his book is an treat too.

 


Born in New Orleans in 1931, Rolland Golden—who passed away in July 2019—spent much of his career as an artist drawing and painting Southern scenes. After serving in the Navy, Golden attended the John McCrady Art School from 1955 to 1957. Those years studying in the French Quarter began a lifelong love for the old buildings and charm of the Vieux Carré. After graduation, Golden married Stella Doussan and opened the Patio Art Studio on Royal Street. In the next few years, and as their family grew to include three children, they moved between several apartments on St. Philip, Royal, St. Ann, and Bourbon Streets—all in the French Quarter.

https://www.hnoc.org/content-rolland-golden%E2%80%99s-sketches-show-changing-french-quarter-50s-and-60s?fbclid=IwAR19M2kOMRdEkQb7CQ4NblExRbF4lZJKaBV0nLHB0-Im2r4ld0gZv-Hxkg4

 

Golden completed this painting of the Napoleon House in 1960. (THNOC, 1975.130)1975.130_web.jpg

Events this week: Glam, literary New Orleans

 

Join us for an evening of carnival-inspired fashion and festivities! Hosted within the Presbytere’s Mardi Gras exhibition, this runway show will present works inspired by the lavish costumes and gowns on display, worn by local performers and models. Attendees will get an after-hours view of Grand Illusions: The History and Artistry of Gay Carnival in New Orleans, which highlights the ground-breaking work of local costumers and krewes and provides further inspiration for how carnival attire can influence year-round fashion. This event is made possible through a partnership with Louisiana State Museum, Friends of the Cabildo, and New Orleans Fashion Week, and all proceeds will benefit the museum.

Purchase tickets here

 

Wednesday (10AM): September 25th
Tickets: $20 Members | $25 General Admission 
Departure Point: 1850 House Museum Store (523 St. Ann St.)

Celebrate the Tennessee Williams Festival with a two-hour French Quarter Literary Tour. The French Quarter and New Orleans served as a muse for some of most important American writers of the 20th century including Tennessee Williams, William Faulkner and Truman Capote. Follow their paths through the French Quarter and see how the city impacted their writing.

Purchase tickets here

 

 

Policing the police

 

Thanks to MaCCNO for posting this today. An extremely important piece!

 

“I witnessed numerous instances of private patrols harassing French Quarter street sellers, so the French Market Corporation and other businesses that paid into these patrols could monopolize the historic neighborhood’s tourist market. Once, I heard that a New Orleans police officer issued a ticket to a street poet selling custom-written poems to tourists. I looked up the incident and indeed, the officer issued the ticket. When I searched for body-worn camera video, I discovered that none existed. Upon further investigation, I learned that the officer—who was in uniform, performing a police patrol duty and not guarding a business—was detailed to a private patrol. He was neither issued a camera, nor required to videotape the encounter.

I searched records for other officers similarly detailed to privately operated police patrols and found numerous instances of them issuing tickets for “quality of life” crimes such as blocking sidewalks. These were thinly veiled attempts to remove homeless people and artisanal sellers from the Quarter, so they did not disturb tourists or divert business from its shops and “street markets” such as the French Market, an open-air market near the banks of the Mississippi River.”

My Year As A New Orleans Consent Decree Insider

The Music and Culture Coalition of New Orleans (MaCCNO) is a locally based non-profit that has worked at the intersection of culture, social justice and policy for the past 6 years. MaCCNO advocates on the behalf of the city’s musicians, culture bearers and performers. We collaborate with, organize, and empower the New Orleans music and cultural community to preserve and nurture the city’s culture, translating community vision into policy change, and creating positive economic impact.
%d bloggers like this: