…to the midday, double feature, picture show by H N O… (apologies to Rocky Horror)

Clarence John Laughlin documentary double feature

Admission is free. Reservations: wrc@hnoc.org or (504) 523-4662 

HNOC Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres Street

As part of its acclaimed exhibition about Louisiana photographer Clarence John Laughlin (1905–1985), The Historic New Orleans Collection will host a double-feature screening of two documentaries about the eccentric artist on Saturday, March 4, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The screenings include The Phantasmagorical Clarence John Laughlin (2015) by Gene Fredericks and Clarence John Laughlin: An Artist with a Camera (2009) by Michael Frierson and Michael Murphy. The filmmakers for both works will be present to answer questions and discuss their films at each screening.

More information.

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Storyville ‘Guidebooks to Sin’ subject of upcoming events 

“Guidebooks to Sin: The Blue Books of Storyville, New Orleans”

  • Author lecture: Pamela Arceneaux will discuss the book
  • Queen Anne Ballroom of the Hotel Monteleone: 214 Royal St.
  • When: Friday, Feb. 3, 5:30 p.m.
  • More information: The lecture will be followed by a reception and signing at the collection, 533 Royal St. The lecture is free, but reservations are required. They can be made by writing wrc@hnoc.org or calling 504.523.4662.

“What the blue books give you is the sizzle but not the steak,” Arceneaux said.

 

This promises to be a landmark book uncovering an often misunderstood era of New Orleans. Arceneaux is a very well-respected librarian and researcher and an expert on Storyville. The event on Friday will be fascinating but if you miss it you can grab a copy of the book at HNOC’s lovely gift shop in the 500 block of Royal.

 

Source: Storyville ‘Guidebooks to Sin’ subject of upcoming events | NOLA.com

Guidebooks to Sin

Join THNOC on Friday, February 3, for the release of Guidebooks to Sin: The Blue Books of Storyville, New Orleans by Pamela D. Arceneaux. Between 1897 and 1917, a legal red-light district thrived at the edge of the French Quarter, helping establish the notorious reputation that adheres to New Orleans today. Though many scholars have written about Storyville, no thorough contemporary study of the blue books–directories of the neighborhood’s prostitutes, featuring advertisements for liquor, brothels, and other goods and services–has been available until now.
Arceneaux’s examination of these rare guides invites readers into a version of Storyville created by its own entrepreneurs. A foreword by the historian Emily Epstein Landau places the blue books in the context of their time, concurrent with the rise of American consumer culture and modern advertising. Illustrated with hundreds of facsimile pages from the blue books in THNOC’s holdings, Guidebooks to Sin illuminates the intersection of race, commerce, and sex in this essential chapter of New Orleans history.
The book, which retails for $50, will be available for purchase at The Shop at The Collection, local independent bookstores, and national online retailers beginning Friday, February 3. The book release event is free and open to the public. Registration is required. Email wrc@hnoc.org or call (504) 523-4662 to make reservations.
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Friday, February 3

5:30 – 6:30 p.m.: Lecture with
Pamela D. Arceneaux, THNOC senior librarian/rare books curator, at the
Queen Anne Ballroom, Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal Street
6:30 – 8 p.m.: Reception and book signing
The Historic New Orleans Collection
533 Royal Street
Admission is free, but reservations are required. Email wrc@hnoc.org or call (504) 523-4662 to make reservations.
The Historic New Orleans Collection presents
February 4, 2017
Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal Street
Registration is required to attend the symposium, and early registration is available through Friday, January 13, with rates ranging between $40 and $75. Rates will increase to $50 – $85 on Saturday, January 14, and registration will remain open as long as space is available. Register online or call (504) 523-4662 to register via telephone.
Though the citizens of New Orleans may not have known it at the time, the year 1917 was a pivotal moment in the city’s history. The first jazz recording, “Livery Stable Blues,” was released, and Storyville, the famed red-light district, closed. One hundred years later, the 2017 Williams Research Center Symposium, Storyville and Jazz, 1917: An End and a Beginning, examines the ways in which the neighborhood and the musical movement have shaped perceptions of New Orleans around the world. A schedule of talks is available online. Early registration is available through Friday, January 13.
The 22nd annual Williams Research Center Symposium is presented by The Historic New Orleans Collection with support from Hotel Monteleone and ClearBridge Advisors, Inc. Additional support is provided by St. Denis J. Villere & Co.; Becker Suffern McLanahan, Ltd.; AOS Interior Environments; Baptist Community Ministries; Bywater Woodworks, Inc.; Exterior Designs, Inc.; Milling Benson Woodward, LLP; Waggonner & Ball Architects; New Orleans Convention and Visitors Bureau; New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation; Premium Parking; and Solaris Garage.

Shopping 1825-1925

Our best French Quarter museum, The Historic New Orleans Collection, has another interesting exhibit that just opened and will run for 6 months over on Royal Street. Their exhibits are free and are conveniently located just off the gift shop. The exhibit is called Goods of Every Description: Shopping in New Orleans, 1825–1925.

So much of what we ate, wore and used in this colonial city was imported from other American cities and in the case of the furniture or finer household items, quite often from European makers. One of the luxuries of being a significant port city.

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Mule-drawn streetcar model; between 1865 and 1870; silver, gold; by Zimmerman’s (New Orleans); The Historic New Orleans Collection, acquisition made possible by the Laussat Society, 2015.0464.20

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“The German Bazaar of New Orleans, 1915”

Wednesday:Lecture to highlight local German American event during WWI
Letter from the office of New Orleans Mayor Martin Behrman responding to request for support for the German Bazaar; April 1915;THNOC, gift of Deutsches Haus, 2008.0113
a lecture by THNOC Deputy Director Daniel Hammer, presented in conjunction with the exhibition At Home and at War: New Orleans, 1914 – 1919
Wednesday, April 20, 2016
extended exhibition viewing: 5:30 – 6 p.m.
lecture: 6 p.m.
Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres Street
Admission is free. Reservations: (504) 523-4662 or wrc@hnoc.org
                              
On Wednesday, April 20, THNOC Deputy Director Daniel Hammer will discuss the 1915 German Bazaar, an event that helped fortify a sense of community identity among the city’s German Americans.
In April 1915, nine months after World War I engulfed Europe, the German community in New Orleans held a major public event to raise funds for the German and Austrian Red Cross, while also educating fellow citizens about the German war effort. The United States would not enter the conflict for another two years, and Germany and Austria had not yet become the subject of intense American pro-war propaganda. The event was supported by a number of prominent community figures, including then-mayor Martin Behrman (see above), and was a tremendous success, in part because of the city’s rich German culture.
The existing documentation of the event is remarkably complete, making the German Bazaar a rare window into the life of the German American community of New Orleans at a critical time in history. Reserve your seat for the lecture today by emailing wrc@hnoc.org or calling (504) 523-4662.