Events this week: Glam, literary New Orleans

 

Join us for an evening of carnival-inspired fashion and festivities! Hosted within the Presbytere’s Mardi Gras exhibition, this runway show will present works inspired by the lavish costumes and gowns on display, worn by local performers and models. Attendees will get an after-hours view of Grand Illusions: The History and Artistry of Gay Carnival in New Orleans, which highlights the ground-breaking work of local costumers and krewes and provides further inspiration for how carnival attire can influence year-round fashion. This event is made possible through a partnership with Louisiana State Museum, Friends of the Cabildo, and New Orleans Fashion Week, and all proceeds will benefit the museum.

Purchase tickets here

 

Wednesday (10AM): September 25th
Tickets: $20 Members | $25 General Admission 
Departure Point: 1850 House Museum Store (523 St. Ann St.)

Celebrate the Tennessee Williams Festival with a two-hour French Quarter Literary Tour. The French Quarter and New Orleans served as a muse for some of most important American writers of the 20th century including Tennessee Williams, William Faulkner and Truman Capote. Follow their paths through the French Quarter and see how the city impacted their writing.

Purchase tickets here

 

 

Sazerac Company buys historic Canal street buildings for new museum

(Further solidifying my theory that the river end of Canal will soon have a majority of high end retail shops and visitor amenities, with lower-end retail migrating closer to the hospital corridor on Canal and on Tulane. Now, if only the city would step up and offer the owners incentives for rent-controlled apartments and “boarding houses” on the top floors of some of these buildings to keep premium staff for these places and for the restaurant industry nearby. This would revitalize Canal and Iberville overnight.)

The buildings will also include a gift shop and Sazerac company offices, with a projection of 60 employees eventually working there, 45 of which will be new positions.

The buildings, which have sat vacant for more than 30 years, date back to the mid-1800s and contain rich architectural details including wood floors, high ceilings, over-sized windows, and ornate support columns throughout. As many of the original design elements as possible will be kept as the buildings undergo renovation.

Source: Sazerac Company buys historic Canal street buildings for new Sazerac museum and visitor attraction

The Fundamentals of Letter Writing | Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses

Do you miss the art of the handwritten letter?  Hermann-Grima/Gallier Historic Houses are hosting a workshop just for you!

In this two-hour class, Nancy Sharon Collins will instruct, discuss, and encourage participants to practice hand-writing personal notes and letters. Collins is the country’s leading expert on engraved social stationery and authored The Complete Engraver, a guide to monograms, crests, ciphers, seals, and the etiquette and history of social stationery. She’s a frequent subject of popular media such as Town & Country, Garden & Gun, Martha Stewart Wedding, Vogue, Veranda, The New York Times, and the WWNO/NPR show “Out to Lunch.”

The workshop is July 23 at 10 AM. Bring your own stationery and favorite writing instrument, be it gel pen or quill feather and ink bottle! Gallier House is located at 1132 Royal Street in the French Quarter.

Source: The Fundamentals of Letter Writing | Hermann-Grima + Gallier Historic Houses

Quarter Calamondins

Over the years, I have kept an eye on the citrus tree in the corner of the garden of Mrs. Parkinson-Keyes’ house at Ursuline and Chartres, which looks like a kumquat tree. Some years, it is so laden down with fruit in January that it hangs low enough to pick some on the street side. Almost all winter, the sidewalk is slick with fallen fruit, mushed by the feet of those on their way to Croissant D’Or or to Royal Street and beyond.

A little over a year ago, I decided to contact the director of the Beauregard-Keyes Museum  to see if they would allow me to pick the fruit. I emailed them and almost immediately received a reply, “Dear neighbor, I received your request to pick our tree-but I must tell you that it is not a kumquat, but a calamondin tree. If you still would like the fruit, feel free to come in the garden after we open each day and help yourself! We only pick a small amount around the holidays to put on gifts so there is always plenty.”

After looking up calamondins, here is what I found:

Camondin, Citrus mitis, is an acid citrus fruit originating in China, which was introduced to the U.S. as an “acid orange” about 1900.   This plant is grown more for its looks than for its fruit edibility and performs well as a patio plant or when trimmed as a hedge. It is hardy to 20 degrees F.  and is hardier to cold than any other true citrus specie—only the trifoliate orange and the kumquat are more tolerant to low temperatures.    The edible fruit is small and orange, about one inch in diameter, and resembles a small tangerine.
The fruit is  smaller than a typical lime, have a thinner skin, and seem best used within a week after harvest if not refrigerated.  When picking the fruit, it is best to use clippers or scissors to get them off of the tree, rather than pulling them. This will keep the stem end of the fruit from tearing, which promotes deterioration.

The juice of the calamondin can be used like lemon or lime to make refreshing beverages, to flavor fish, to make cakes, marmalades, pies, preserves, sauces and to use in soups and teas.   The juice can be frozen in containers or in ice cube trays, then storing the frozen cubes in plastic freezer bags.  Use a few cubes at a time to make calamondinade.   The juice is primarily valued for making acid beverages. It is often employed like lime or lemon juice to make gelatin salads or desserts, custard  pie or chiffon pie. In the Philippines, the extracted juice, with the addition of gum tragacanth as an emulsifier, is pasteurized and bottled commercially. This product must be stored at low temperature to keep well.  The juice of the calamondin also makes an excellent hair conditioner.  Pour 1 liter of boiling water over thinly sliced fruit.  Let it steep.  When water is cool, pour through the hair as a final rinse.  The fruit juice is used in the Philippines to bleach ink stains from fabrics. It also serves as a body deodorant.   Rubbing calamondin juice on insect bites banishes the itching and irritation. It bleaches freckles and helps to clear up acne vulgaris and pruritus vulvae. It is taken orally as a cough remedy and antiphlogistic.  Slightly diluted and drunk warm, it serves as a laxative. Combined with pepper, it is prescribed in Malaya to expel phlegm. The root enters into a treatment given at childbirth. The distilled oil of the leaves serves as a carminative with more potency than peppermint oil.

 

 

I asked a few of my foraging friends if they wanted to come along and my chef pal Anne Churchill is the one person who almost always takes me up on it. She and I bring a ladder in her old creaky truck and climb up with bags (actually she brings bus tubs from her kitchen)  and snip away. We catch up as we work and discuss the health of the tree and answer questions from passersby.

Over the last few years, I have harvested 3-5 gallons of citrus at least 8-10 times, as has Anne. I make it into syrups and share that and the fruit with friends, including the chef at Meauxbar, Kristen Essig, who I used to work with at the farmers market organization.

Today, I actually bought my 10-foot tree pruner and cut more of the old growth away and more from the street side: being alone this time and on that side meant I had many more interactions, including a scowling neighbor who asked if I had permission, one of the museum volunteers who seemed confused by my explanation that I was a neighbor and not their landscaper and many visitors who wanted to know more about the tree, about the house and about other random things.

It is my great pleasure to work in the sun, in my beautiful neighborhood and share the bounty of the trees and plants put here by our previous generations.

 

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They just added this bower for a recent event, likely a wedding.

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A close up of one of the calamondins

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December’s haul (actually half of it) as I wash the fruit first

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Cooking the calamondins. I cook them for a very long time, with honey, cayenne pepper and satsuma juice added.

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Finished product

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Me up in the tree in 2014

 

Newcomb Pottery exhibit

Update for 2015:  Still up as an exhibit; if you haven’t seen it, I recommend it heartily. And now you can have lunch afterwards at Petit Amelie right across the street, which is the most beautiful cafe in the Quarter.

(original 2012 post)
Over a sunny lunch hour, I dragged my 1970s Crescent folding bike out from behind the lawnmower (been raining a lot lately is my only excuse) and headed to the Quarter.
After a delightful lunch at Stanley’s-well except for the wait staff’s obsession with their new iPhones, although I think a very good idea to have them for taking orders. The real issue today was the less than stellar bar staff but  I’m still loyal to this chef and his wife, so stayed for a cherry-limeade Italian soda and a bowl of their gumbo with potato salad dumped in and was glad I did.

Afterwards, I unlocked the Crescent and headed to Dumaine, between Chartres and Royal.
Madame John’s Legacy is said by some to be either the oldest or the second oldest building in the Quarter. Ursuline Convent is usually considered to be the oldest and since MJL burned in the first fire that swept through the Quarter and had to be rebuilt, I’m not sure why some fight for the oldest designation.
Okay, maybe its just wild talking mule carriage drivers that say that. I am also sure that the many expert historians could make a case for either if needed.

In any case, it has to be the plainest building in the Quarter.

I like that about it, but it must be hard for people to believe its a museum with its undecorated green front (historically accurate colors by the way) and its entrance at street level under the stairs. As locals know, the gingerbread and vibrant colors came with that nutty Victorian age. The name itself comes from a George Washington Cable story, a writer interestingly, who worked in part of the same time period as the Newcomb Pottery folks and was known for his sympathetic and sensitive portrayal of the complex culture found in New Orleans.
Once you get upstairs, a very courteous security officer at the desk gives a short overview of the fact that this exhibit is free (thanks to the Friends of the Cabildo, you’re very welcome) and that pictures are allowed.
I was the only person in there until the end when a couple of French men came in and went directly to the house descriptions rather than to the Newcomb exhibit. The exhibit is set up in 4 rooms, with one or two cases in each laid out in different periods. For those unfamiliar with Newcomb, pottery or even the name, it was a celebrated liberal arts women’s college at Tulane University. Until 2006 that is, and then scandalously to many Newcomb graduates, the management of Tulane ceased the operation of this endowed college and folded it and its endowment into the larger university. I can understand the argument that there may not be a need for a women’s college any longer but talk about kicking people when they’re down…
In any case Newcomb operated this pottery business for about 50 years really, from the late 1800s through the early 1940s. Its pottery became quite the collectors item for arts and crafts pottery enthusiasts and it is some of the loveliest work you’ll see. The detail is striking, especially since they often used local flora and fauna for their motifs.
The arts and crafts movement itself was an artistic response to the industrialization of America and also a way to allow women to work on their degree. Having grown up also in Ohio, I was already familiar with Rookwood Pottery, which was the most well known of the arts and crafts pottery-a friend in Cincinnati has Rookwood fireplace detail in her apartment, which is not that unusual to find there….
The Newcomb school allowed women to design and paint designs, but the actual pottery wheel was handled by men! ugh. I’m gonna leave that alone….

Interestingly, the most well known prolific potter at Newcomb, Joseph Meyer, was the son of a French Market vendor who sold utilitarian wares.
This modest exhibit is at the perfect venue and is well worth the trip to Dumaine.

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FQF: Film, talk, dance, opera and kids activities

The best festival New Orleans has to offer, and it’s free. Come and spend a few days in the Quarter.

Special Events on Thursday, April 9, 2015

French Quarter Festival Second-Line Kickoff Parade – 100 block of Bourbon Street to Jackson Square – 10AM

Irvin Mayfield and the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra: the music of Stevie Wonder, The Beatles, and The Grateful Dead with special guests Steve Masakowski, Glen David Andrews, Don Vappie, Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, and Ed “Sweetbread” Petersen. Abita Beer Stage 5:20PM

2015 Gala at Antoine’s Restaurant – For information and to purchase tickets click here. – Patron Party 7PM; Gala 8PM

Special Events on Friday, April 10, 2015

French Quarter Festival and NOLA Jitterbugs present free dance lessons – The French Market Traditional Jazz Stage and the Chevron Cajun-Zydeco Showcase will feature dancing and classes in the following: Traditional Jazz, 1920s Charleston, Swing Dance, Cajun Jitterbug, and Zydeco. Classes are taught by professional dancers from NOLA Jitterbugs and Dance Quarter. All classes are free and open to the public.

Film Festival at French Quarter Festival, presented by Timecode: NOLA – Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre. Free and open to the public.

11AM Buckwheat’s World – exclusive behind-the-scenes peek at the life and music of Buckwheat Zydeco.
12PM Streetcar Stories – this broadcast documentary explores the cultural history of New Orleans streetcars and the US streetcar industry.
1:30PM Always for Pleasure – a cinematic celebration of the Mardi Gras that dwells on the sensual pleasures of the festival.
3PM All on a Mardi Gras Day – the story of New Orleans’ black carnival traditions: the Zulus, Indians, Baby Dolls, Skeletons and the men and women who carried on these traditions for over a century.
Irvin Mayfield and the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra: the music of Nirvana, Queen, and Led Zeppelin with special guests The Breton Sound, Glen David Andrews, Haley Reinhart, and Stanton Moore. Abita Beer Stage 5:25PM

The French Market presents Opera at Dusk; operatic performances with musical accompaniment sponsored by the French Market. Upper Pontalba building on Jackson Square, at Chartres St. near St. Peter. 7PM

Special Events on Saturday, April 11, 2015

Pirates Alley Juried Art Show – presented by the New Orleans Art Association; over 100 artists displaying original fine art in Pirates Alley, Pere Antoine Alley, Cabildo Alley, and Royal Street – 8AM-6PM

Rouses World Championship Crawfish Eating Contest hosted by Rouses and the IFEA (International Federation of Eating) at Louisiana State Museum’s Old U.S. Mint – HIGH NOON

Irvin Mayfield and the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra: children’s songs with special guests Glen David Andrews, Big Sam, and Davell Crawford. Abita Beer Stage 12:35PM

French Quarter Festival and NOLA Jitterbugs present free dance lessons – The French Market Traditional Jazz Stage and the Chevron Cajun-Zydeco Showcase will feature dancing and classes in the following: Traditional Jazz, 1920s Charleston, Swing Dance, Cajun Jitterbug, and Zydeco. Classes are taught by professional dancers from NOLA Jitterbugs and Dance Quarter. All classes are free and open to the public.

Let Them Talk: Conversations on Louisiana Music – Louisiana State Museum’s Old U.S. Mint, 3rd Floor. Free and open to the public.

11:30AM The Write Brothers Take Flight There is an understandable buzz around the recent formation of The Write Brothers band by four of the Crescent City’s best songwriters: Spencer Bohren, Jim McCormick, Alex McMurray and Paul Sanchez. The four talk about the origins of the band, their ambitions for it, and the new Write Brothers cd with interviewer Fred Kasten.

12:30PM Meet Blues Hall of Fame Writer John Broven Music history author and researcher John Broven is a member of the Louisiana and Blues Halls of Fame, co-creator of the Cosimo Code website (http://cosimocode.com) archiving and detailing the work of great New Orleans recording engineer Cosimo Matassa, and the author of two books widely hailed as among the best about Louisiana music, Rhythm and Blues in New Orleans (with an upgraded edition due out later this year) and South to Louisiana: The Music of the Cajun Bayous. He’ll talk about his life as a writer, researcher and Louisiana music lover with interviewer Fred Kasten.

1:30PM Tribute to Lionel Ferbos When New Orleans trumpeter and vocalist Lionel Ferbos passed away last July at age 103, he left behind a legion of fans and admirers – and a legacy of dedication to his craft that spanned nearly 90 years. For Let Them Talk, writer Jon Pult, historian Al Kennedy, and longtime musical colleagues Lars Edegran and Brian O’Connell share their memories of and stories about Lionel Ferbos.

2:30PM Salute to Big Chief Bo Dollis For many New Orleanians – and people around the world – the powerful, soul-drenched, joy-filled voice of Big Chief Theodore Emile “Bo” Dollis is the sound of Mardi Gras Indians in New Orleans. Bo Dollis passed away on January 20th this year at age 71, but his spirit lives on in a legacy of great recordings, memorable live performances, beautiful years of masking – and the efforts of his wife Rita Dollis and son Bo Dollis, Jr. – who talk with music writer Alison Fensterstock about Bo Dollis’s legacy and accomplishments.

3:30PM New Orleans Jazz Playhouse Grammy-winning trumpeter, bandleader and author Irvin Mayfield – and Basin Street Records President, and publisher, Mark Samuels – talk with interviewer Fred Kasten about their latest collaboration, a 304-page coffee-table book, New Orleans Jazz Playhouse – which comes complete with seven cds of music. The music was recorded live over seven nights at Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse club in the Royal Sonesta on Bourbon Street, and the book – which includes portraits by such gifted photographers as Gordon Parks and Herman Leonard – is a blend of hymn to New Orleans and jazz – and memoir.

4:30PM Clarinet Orange Orange Kellin is an outstanding clarinetist and arranger, a native of Sweden who moved to New Orleans in 1966, and a world-renowned ambassador for traditional New Orleans jazz. Orange performed on the Oscar-nominated score for Louis Malle’s film Pretty Baby, was one of the creators of the hit musical One Mo’ Time, accompanied Louis Armstrong for his 70th birthday at Newport – and has played or recorded with a host of other top artists, including Earl Hines, Teddy Wilson, Zutty Singleton and Danny Barker.

Film Festival at French Quarter Festival, presented by Timecode: NOLA – Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre. Free and open to the public.
11AM Spend it All – portrait of the Cajun lifestyle in Southwest Louisiana.
12:30PM Fats Domino: Walkin’ Back To New Orleans – a one-hour documentary and concert special that combines interviews, vintage footage, and a recent concert taped at Tipitina’s.
2PM He’s the Prettiest: A Salute to Big Chief Allison “Tootie” Montana’s 50 Years of Mardi Gras Indian Suiting – a documentary chronicling Mardi Gras Indian Big Chief Allison “Tootie” Montana.
3PM Real New Orleans – this series of humorous videos was written by and starred the late Eddie Kurtz in the 1980’s.
Chevron Children’s Headquarters on the Riverfront at the Natchez Wharf featuring the Chevron “STEAM” Zone (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) with interactive, fascinating fun for families. Community partners include: The Nature Conservancy, New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, Project Lead the Way, the George Rodrigue Foundation, Audubon Nature Institute, Tulane Pediatrics, the New Orleans Jazz National Historic Park. Fiddler crab races, instrument “petting zoo”, robots, and more! Also featuring the Children’s Performance Tent sponsored by Tulane Pediatrics and the New Orleans Jazz Historic Park. 11AM-5PM

Children’s Museum Activities & Fun at the Hermann-Grima House, sponsored by Chevron Enjoy music, entertainment, crafts, and educational projects for children of all ages hosted by the Hermann-Grima House. Community partners include the Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans, Young Audiences Louisiana, The Green Project, Beauregard-Keyes House, New Orleans Public Library, RicRACK, Inc., and Louisiana State Museum. The Hermann-Grima House is located at 820 St. Louis Street – Noon-5PM.

La Belle Galerie presents Opera at Dusk – operatic performances by tenor Marshall Richards with musical accompaniment; sponsored by La Belle Galerie. 300 Block of Chartres Street. – 7PM

Battle of the Bands – traditional jazz bands compete in a rousing playoff – 400 block of Royal – 5:30-7PM

Special Events on Sunday April 12, 2015

Pirates Alley Juried Art Show – presented by the New Orleans Art Association; over 100 artists displaying original fine art in Pirates Alley, Pere Antoine Alley, Cabildo Alley, and Royal Street – 8AM-6PM

French Quarter Festival and NOLA Jitterbugs present free dance lessons – The French Market Traditional Jazz Stage and the Chevron Cajun-Zydeco Showcase will feature dancing and classes in the following: Traditional Jazz, 1920s Charleston, Swing Dance, Cajun Jitterbug, and Zydeco. Classes are taught by professional dancers from NOLA Jitterbugs and Dance Quarter. All classes are free and open to the public.

Let Them Talk: Conversations on Louisiana Music – Louisiana State Museum’s Old U.S. Mint, 3rd Floor. Free and open to the public.

11:30PM The Multi-faceted Musical World of Carl LeBlanc Guitarist and banjoist Carl LeBlanc has covered a lot of musical territory in his career – including significant tenures with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band and Sun Ra Arkestra – and quality stops with Fats Domino, Allen Toussaint, the Dirty Dozen, and the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, among others. He’s also led his own groups for many years – and made major contributions to music education in New Orleans and Louisiana. He’ll talk about those various experiences with interviewer Fred Kasten.
12:30PM The Magic of Cosimo Matassa Roy Brown’s “Good Rockin’ Tonight,” Lloyd Price’s “Lawdy Miss Clawdy,” Little Richard’s “Tutti-Frutti,” Shirley and Lee’s “Let the Good Times Roll,” Fats Domino’s “Walkin’ to New Orleans,” Frankie Ford’s “Sea Cruise,” Ernie K-Doe’s “Mother-In-Law,” and Robert Parker’s “Barefootin’” are just a few of the classics recorded by engineer Cosimo Matassa in his several New Orleans studios over a 20 year run from the late 40s to late 60s – one of the great stretches in the history of pop music. Hall of Fame songwriter and producer Allen Toussaint; guitarist, vocalist and session man extraordinaire Deacon John; singer Gerri Hall of Huey Smith and the Clowns and Raelettes fame; and music historian and researcher John Broven explore what made Cosimo Matassa, who passed away last September at age 88, so great.
1:30PM Leaving Las Vegas Singer Lena Prima was born in Las Vegas, grew up there and in New Orleans, two cities that were important to her father, the great Louis Prima. Lena established her performing career in Las Vegas, eventually creating a very popular show that paid tribute to her dad. Then, in 2011, she decided to move back to New Orleans to work on finding her own voice, and creating some repertoire to express it. The result: her widely acclaimed cd “Starting Something” – most of which she co-wrote with husband Tim Fahey and New Orleans singer/songwriter Ingrid Lucia. She’ll talk about her dad’s legacy, and coming home to New Orleans, with music writer Keith Spera.
2:30PM They Called Him “Coach” “Coach” was the nickname fondly conferred on great New Orleans saxophonist and bandleader Al Belletto by his musical colleagues for his wisdom and warmth in music, and life. Al Belletto, who passed away last December at age 86, was a stalwart of modern jazz in New Orleans who led top-notch bands, including a benchmark sextet in the 1950s that toured nationally and made three acclaimed recordings for Capitol. He also brought modern jazz to the French Quarter as music director for the Playboy Club in New Orleans – and played key roles in the creation of Jazz Fest and the French Quarter Festival. Four musical colleagues – Steve Giarratano, Rhodes Spedale, Rick Trolsen and John Vidacovich will discuss the life and legacy of Al Belletto with moderator Fred Kasten.
3:30PM A Duke and a Squirrel Nut Zipper Trumpeter Duke Heitger tours the world playing classic jazz and swing with some of the best musicians on the planet. He also has gold and platinum records for his studio work on the Squirrel Nut Zippers’ 1996 recording Hot. A native of Toledo, Ohio – and son of a jazz clarinetist and bandleader – Duke Heitger has been based in New Orleans since the early 1990s. When in town, he leads his Steamboat Stompers on the paddlewheeler Natchez and plays regularly at the Palm Court Jazz Café. He’ll talk about his love of New Orleans and life in music with interviewer Fred Kasten.
4:30PM Jo-El Sonnier and The Legacy The Legacy is the title of accordion master and songwriter Jo-El Sonnier’s 2014 recording that just won the 2015 Grammy Award for Best Regional Roots Album – and the legacy of Sonnier’s Cajun culture and heritage is something he’s returned to in his music time after time in a career that’s also seen him have success in country music. A native of Rayne, Louisiana and accordion prodigy who first recorded when he was 11, Jo-El Sonnier will talk about his more than 50 year career in music with interviewer Fred Kasten.
Film Festival at French Quarter Festival, presented by Timecode:NOLA – Le Petit Theater du Vieux Carre. Free and open to the public.

11AM This Cat Can Play Anything – a portrayal of the life and musical career of New Orleans banjo and guitar jazzman Emanuel ‘Manny’ Sayles.
12 PM Louisiana Music Video Showcase – various music videos from such artists as Preservation Hall Band, the Bingo Show, Timothea and more.
1:30PM A Tribute to Toussaint – a concert documentary film celebrating the musical career of Allen Toussaint.
3PM Faubourg Tremé: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans – a riveting tale of hope, heartbreak and resiliency set in New Orleans’ most fascinating neighborhood.
Irvin Mayfield and the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra: the New Orleans Songbook with special guests George Porter, Jr., Stanton Moore, Glen David Andrews, Walter Wolfman Washington, and Big Sam. Abita Beer Stage 2:10PM

Chevron Children’s Headquarters on the Riverfront at the Natchez Wharf featuring the Chevron “STEAM” Zone (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) with interactive, fascinating fun for families. Community partners include: The Nature Conservancy, New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, Project Lead the Way, the George Rodrigue Foundation, Audubon Nature Institute, Tulane Pediatrics, the New Orleans Jazz National Historic Park. Fiddler crab races, instrument “petting zoo”, robots, and more! Also featuring the Children’s Performance Tent sponsored by Tulane Pediatrics and the New Orleans Jazz Historic Park. 11AM-5PM

Children’s Museum Activities & Fun at the Hermann-Grima House, sponsored by Chevron Enjoy music, entertainment, crafts, and educational projects for children of all ages hosted by the Hermann-Grima House. Community partners include the Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans, Young Audiences Louisiana, The Green Project, Beauregard-Keyes House, New Orleans Public Library, RicRACK, Inc., and Louisiana State Museum. The Hermann-Grima House is located at 820 St. Louis Street – Noon-5PM.

St. Louis Cathedral Annual Spring Concert – Admission is free and open to the general public. 3:30PM

Dancing at Dusk – You’ll be ‘In the Mood’ for a ‘Sentimental Journey’ with the sounds of Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Count Basie and other favorites from the 30s, 40s, and 50s. Come dance and swing at this festival favorite with The Tomcats. 400 block of Royal Street – 6:00-7:15PM

oh yeah there is music too