The Man in the Red Beret

The brilliant Troubled Men Podcast features the ever-present chess master Jude Acers. Acers is best known for playing against all comers in a New Orleans downtown gazebo while wearing a red beret. A longtime resident of Louisiana, he claims to have been the first New Orleans native chess master of comparable strength since Paul Morphy.

Acers in the French Quarter in 2011

He is also known for being a great showman, touring the country giving simultaneous chess exhibitions. He was twice the world record holder of having played the most opponents in a simultaneous exhibition. First against 117 opponents (1974, Lloyd Center, Portland, Oregon), then against 179 opponents (1976, Mid Island Plaza, Long Island, New York). The records were certified by the Guinness Book of World Records.

This podcast is exactly what you’d expect of Jude,  if you have ever heard him hold the floor in a convo. Its as New Orleans as it gets baby.

//troubledmenpodcast.podiant.co/e/37065e828ca808/embed/

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Scandinavian Jazz Church closing

as reported on NOLA.com:

The church plans to continue with regular and special events through December, including the Scandinavia Festival, which takes place Nov. 2-3 this year, and its St. Lucia Celebration in December, according to the release. Jazz services will also continue on the first, second and third Sundays of each month, with a piano service on the fourth Sunday of the month. The church will also have a Norwegian service on Oct. 28.

The Scandinavian Jazz Church will officially cease operations Dec. 31. Mikalson said in the release the building is under contract to be sold to a new owner by the end of the year. The buyer was not disclosed.

Golden Age of New Orleans Literature with Nancy Dixon

My pal and one of favorite storytellers and literary critics, Dr. Nancy Dixon was on Susan Larson’s Tricentennial Reading List this week. This whole series by Susan is magnificent. But start with “DoctorDix”

Nancy Dixon with Susan Larson

 

Home page of series

 

 

Little Queenie

From the great singer Debbie Davis on FB 09/21/2018:

I have few words for this. My mentor, my confidant, cheering section, intellectual ninja, emotional gibraltar, musical beacon, one of my truest and bluest friends is not long for this world. Leigh ‘Lil Queenie’ Harris is going into home hospice today. Anyone with a deity that is currently taking your calls, put in a word for her that she be granted enough time in this mortal coil (in appropriate comfort) for her to see those who love her one more time. How we will ever tell her how much she did? How much it all meant? How grateful we are? How?
Goddammit. How.

 

2016 post:

Leigh Harris is a legend in the New Orleans music scene and a lovely, funny, fierce woman. Let’s show her how her home town loves her in her difficult time.

As of September 2018, the GoFundMe page has been joined by The New Orleans Musicians’ Assistance Foundation which now has a fund setup for Leigh Harris. They are a non profit, and donations to the NOMAF are tax deductible. The donations will help her family with the costs.

They will accept checks – mail them to:

New Orleans Musicians’ Assistance Foundation
1525 Louisiana Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70115
Attn: Lizz Freeman, Donor Advised Funds

and include a note of “donation to the fund for Leigh Harris” on the check.

They also will accept credit card and paypal donations.

 

Bicycling while Black?

This gentleman received this ticket at 4 am in the morning over on Gentilly. This is absolutely shameful and MUST result in action by our city government to reduce this type of harassment. The stated costs of each infraction are also shocking and need to be reduced to a warning for a convicted first offense, and then a minimal charge for later charges.
Education about what is required by cyclists would be great; unlike auto drivers, there is no required training for any rider of a bike and many of these rules are simply not known to riders.
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Pride June 8-10

34411280_10156380164999337_4136195781134647296_nNew Orleans Gay Pride began in February 1971, when the newly formed Gay Liberation Front of New Orleans presented a “Gay In” picnic in City Park. This was the very first such event in the entire state of Louisiana.

Throughout the 1980s, several organizations spearheaded the annual events. The first street parade was held in 1980. In 1981, the event moved to Armstrong Park, and was emceed by New Orleans native Ellen DeGeneres. In 1988 “Gay Fest” was changed to “Gay Pride.”

By the 1990s, “Pridefest” was being sponsored by the New Orleans Alliance of Pride.

In 2005, Gay Pride was presented by the LGBT Community Center of New Orleans. In 2011, The LGBT Community Center decided to no longer produce the Pridefest event and gave all rights for PrideFest to the 2010 and 2011 local Grand Marshals.

In 2011, The New Orleans Pride Organization was formed as its own organization and acquired a 501(c)(3) status. The 2011 “New Orleans Gay Pride Festival” consisted only of a parade, pageant, and block party on Bourbon Street with 80’s pop star, Tiffany. In 2012, the festival officially became “New Orleans Pride.” Since then, The New Orleans Pride Board has restructured the organization to foster positive relationships between all communities in New Orleans.

The 2017 New Orleans Pride Festival was the largest Pride Festival to ever take place in Louisiana. More than 35 events took place over a three-day weekend, attracting people from all walks of life. The Festival brought in more than 82,000 participants, 3,000 of which were in the New Orleans Pride Parade, Louisiana’s Largest LGBT+ Parade.

Courtesy of https://togetherwenola.com/