Campanella at Jazz Fest next week with new book

Campanella, a Tulane University geographer who occasionally writes for NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune, has come in under the radar with his new book. He will launch “Lost New Orleans” with an April 30 event at the Jazz Fest Book Tent. Filled with grand archival photographs, Campanella’s book ranges across the centuries, cataloging a remarkable array of lost landmarks, from the French Opera House to the Rivergate Exhibition Hall.

If that sounds intriguing, check out Campanella’s much discussed “Bourbon Street: A History,” which vividly detailed the city’s most famous thoroughfare. In a 2014 interview with NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune, he said, “Bourbon Street is a totally authentic, only-in-New-Orleans phenomenon – and a grand success. That’s hard for some people to swallow.”

all of the signings:

FIRST WEEKEND
April 24 – Friday

2-3 p.m., Laura Lane McNeal, “Dollbaby”

3-4 p.m., Tom Cooper, “Marauders”

4-5 p.m., Bruce “Sunpie” Barnes and Rachel Breunlin, “Talk That Music Talk”

April 25 – Saturday

Noon–1 p.m., Chontel Carter Frank, “The Adventurous NoLa Kids Go to the Ruined Mansion”

3-4 p.m., Keith Weldon Medley, “Black Life in Old New Orleans”

4-5 p.m., Patrice Joseph, “Water Line: My Family’s Journey Before, During and After Hurricane Katrina”

5-6 p.m., Dawn Chartier, “Bewitching the Enemy”

5:15-5:30 p.m., Irvin Mayfield, “New Orleans Jazz Playhouse” (Event in Grandstand)

April 26 – Sunday

1-2 p.m., Barri Bronston, “Walking New Orleans”

3-4 p.m., Ashley Kahn, “Universal Tone: Bring My Story to Light, Carlos Santana”

4-5 p.m., Kourtni Mason, “Little Miss Dancey Pants”

SECOND WEEKEND
April 30 – Thursday

1-2 p.m., Bill Loehfelm, “Doing the Devil’s Work”

2-3 p.m., Leif Pederson, “Adventures of Swamp Kids – A Zoo Ta-Do”

3-4 p.m., Richard Campanella, “Lost New Orleans”

May 1 – Friday

1-2 p.m., Bernie Cook, “Flood of Images”

3-4 p.m., Guy Lyman III, “A Big Easy Childhood”

4-5 p.m., Dennis McNally, “On Hwy 61: Race, Music and the Evolution of Cultural Freedom”

May 2 – Saturday

Noon–1 p.m., M.O. Walsh, “My Sunshine Away”

1-2 p.m., Cornell Landry, “Good Night Cajun Land”

2-3 p.m., Michael Pitre, “Fives and Twenty-Fives”

3-4 p.m., Troy Andrews & Brian Collier, “Trombone Shorty”

May 3 – Sunday

1-2 p.m., Brian Boyles, “New Orleans: Boom and Blackout”

2-3 p.m., Johnette Downing, “Fifolet

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“Hating Bourbon Street”

From Rich Campanella’s upcoming book, “Bourbon Street, A History” published this month by Louisiana State University Press. Campanella has long been one of my favorite (quirky) New Orleans historian/writers, as he brings his own flair and point of view to everything he does. He tirelessly walks and bikes and searches for tidbits of history in our city and does much to point out the delicate line between history and lore, while reminding us that sometimes it doesn’t matter which is which.

For all its flamboyance and swagger, Bourbon Street is one of the least pretentious places in town. It’s as utterly uncool as it is wildly successful, and in an era when “cool capital” is increasingly craved and fiscal capital increasingly scarce, there’s something refreshing about a place that flips off coolness and measures success the old-fashioned way: by the millions. And authenticity? Not only does Bourbon Street not try to be authentic, it doesn’t even think about it.

Hating Bourbon Street: Places: Design Observer.

Not seven hills, just seven districts in our history

Another practical history lesson from Richard Campanella, a geographer with the Tulane School of Architecture and a Monroe Fellow with the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South, is the author of “Bienville’s Dilemma,” “Geographies of New Orleans,” and the forthcoming “Bourbon Street: A History” (2014). He may be reached through rcampane@tulane.edu or @nolacampanella on Twitter.

Until just a few years ago, each of the seven districts elected its own assessors, who staffed their own offices and assessed taxes independently — a system unique in the nation. It took civic intervention after Hurricane Katrina to finally consolidate those political redundancies.

Plantations, faubourgs, Creoles, Anglos, competition, expansion, drainage, politics, taxes: embedded in that seemingly mundane map are sundry episodes in the human geography of New Orleans, going back 200 years.

Seven