Easter Parades 2019 French Quarter

The Historic French Quarter Easter Parade

The Historic French Quarter Easter Parade departs from Antoine’s Restaurant at 9:45 a.m. and rolls toward St. Louis Cathedral just in time for 11:00 a.m. mass on Easter Sunday, April 21.  After mass, participants return to Antoine’s to receive awards for best Easter attire and basket, among other things.

 

Chris Owens’ Easter Parade

It starts at the Omni Royal Orleans Hotel Ballroom at 11:00 a.m. with a Hat Contest, Silent Auction, and Entertainment. The parade begins at the corner of St. Louis and Royal, then continues down Royal to Canal to St. Phillip Street and ends at St. Louis and Royal Street at the Omni Royal Orleans Hotel.

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20th Annual Gay Easter Parade

Starting at 4:30 p.m., horse-drawn carriages, floats, and riders in colorful costumes will parade through the French Quarter into the evening, stopping at gay bars and gay-owned restaurants and shops throughout the neighborhood.

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What can we do? (a lot)

Recently saw a Twitter post  from a writer that went something like: race is an imagined point of reference, however, racism is not.

One definition of racism that I keep close is: The deliberate structuring of privilege by means of an objective, differential and unequal treatment of people, for the purpose of social advantage over scarce resources, resulting in an ideology of supremacy which justifies power of position by placing a negative meaning on perceived or actual biological/cultural differences.

As I read that tweet, I wondered what the response would be if I shared that on other social platforms. I assumed much of it would be passive “likes” (you’ll have to imagine my eye roll) and “shares” (my more dramatic eye roll), including from some who seem to have not begun to examine how this society is designed so only whiteness –  either meant literally or operating in the white world as currently allowed – is “winning.” How it offers privilege and access that subjugates people of color even when the  white person is not acting in any personally racist manner. I say that because some  of those I would expect to share it have actually been heard by me to say the infamous “I don’t even see race” or “I don’t think race is the real issue, class is ”  or “I’m tired of this being the only discussion that is happening” (?!) and other cringeworthy statements.

On another level of this, this morning I had a convo with a neighbor who works with tourists which started out relatively calmly but soon included the removed Confederate statues, and led to her shouting about how she had never owned slaved and “they” had received all of the reparations “before” now. How the black people she “knows didn’t want” the statues taken down. (Really, it was a set of statements I have heard in exactly the same order and level of vehemence dozens of times, which in itself, I find very puzzling.  Still, the outcome of our talk was that she thinks I am out of touch, and I think she is dangerous and easily led by those who need to use her for their agenda.)  All I can hope is that I made at least one point that may require her to look it up later and ponder it. It is why I have tried to become calmer when I find these folks in my path, and try to stick to one or two points that may connect.

So between the  outwardly liberal but casually racist,  and the working poor who vilify both those who fight the institutions of racism and those who must live within them, it is hard to see how to help.

Then I read this passage in Toni Morrison’s “The Source of Self-Regard: Selected Essays, Speeches, and Meditations” a book that is becoming as important to my core reference library as Jane Jacobs, Solnit, and Thoreau.

One likely reason for the paucity of critical materials on this large and compelling subject is that in matters of race, silence and evasion have historically ruled literary discourse….

…It is further complicated by the fact that ignoring race is understood to be a graceful, liberal, even generous habit. To notice is to recognize an already discredited difference; to maintain its invisibility through silence is to allow the black body a shadowless participation in the dominant cultural body. (emphasis added)

That passage was very helpful in ways to better understand the weakness of the white response to institutional racism and how even those with a strong liberal political platform subvert the discussion.

In this majority African-American city that I reside, evasion of the facts and the support of invisibility for people of color is the inertia we fight. What that means to me is a path forward for white allies is through statement of facts again and again. And not to pervert it with a false equivalency like class divides or to reduce the severity of the issue to the level of one’s own personal method of operating in the world.

These are the words that I now stick to when making the ask among white people to consider the warped reality that we benefit from: Deliberate. Privilege. Unequal. Negative meaning. Power of position.

And to lift the hope for and any story of inclusion and diversity as often as we can, in every sector we can work and live. In my own work of food and farming, white-led organizations have long been those recognized and funded, with people of color only a tiny smattering of the staff and partners. Doesn’t mean that those good folks were personally racist but it does mean that in the desire to move the dial on other issues, deep systemic issues of race were ignored. (Deliberate privilege to gain power of position.)

Now, the in the 5th decade of this work in the US, many of those organizations and others led by people of color are finally starting the big conversation of how racism is at the heart of production and at the heart of our political, legal, social, and economic systems. And its scary and humbling but it also feels exciting and powerful. To listen more deeply and to participate in more approaches, and to accept that the privilege I have is not even fully understood in this half century of living and so cannot be said to be erased yet. I’m willing to do more and to do it as an ally still learning what I do not know. And to live in and celebrate Bulbancha.

Are you?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stop Canal Street barricading

ICYMI: Today at the Transportation committee meeting announced that they are pressing “pause” on the Canal streetcar plan. will be at on April 8 to discuss the study and offered to speak to other neighborhood groups and stakeholders too.

STOP RTA PLAN TO CLOSE CANAL STREET INTERSECTIONS 
AND ELIMINATE LOCAL STREETCAR STOPS 

  • STREET CROSSING CLOSURES WILL SEVERELY LIMIT ACCESS FOR FIRE, POLICE AND EMS, causing potential life-threatening delays. There has been NO STUDY of impact on public safety.
  • NO TRAFFIC STUDY has been done on the impact of closing 20 street intersections. Traffic will be a nightmare.
  • NO STUDY of ECONOMIC DAMAGE TO MID-CITY BUSINESSES by limiting access – similar to the catastrophic impact on Tulane Avenue in the past.
  • LACK OF TRANSPARENCY AND INPUT: Residents, homeowners, businesses and neighborhood associations in Mid City and Lower Mid City were LEFT OUT from the study.
  • NO CONSIDERATION OF REASONABLE ALTERNATIVES such as adding express buses at peak hours, kiosks at stops to collect fares, adding traffic signals for approaching streetcars at intersections, etc.

 

 

sign the petition.

 

 

64 Parishes: The Pontalbas

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(Henry) Howard claimed authorship of the Pontalba Buildings in his 1872 autobiography, but historian Christina Vella, author of Intimate Enemies: The Two Worlds of Baroness de Pontalba, concludes, “That claim is not borne out by any document concerning the construction of the Pontalbas.” We are left with several mysteries. Who was the architect in New York? What, exactly, did Henry Howard contribute to the design? And what was the baroness’s role in her landmark buildings’ design?

The Baroness de Pontalba and the Rise of Jackson Square is on view at the Louisiana State Museum’s Cabildo through October 13, 2019.

https://64parishes.org/a-spanish-father-and-a-creole-daughters-monumental-legacies-in-new-orleans?platform=hootsuite

Parades, Irish/Italian 2019

 

Pace Yourself

Thu, March 14

Irish Channel block party – 1:00 p.m. starts on Magazine & Felicity at 1:00p.m.

The parade follows Noon Mass at St. Mary’s Assumption Church and is returning to a previous route following the completion of road construction on Louisiana Ave. The parade marches from Magazine St. to Jackson Ave., to St. Charles Ave., to Louisiana Ave., to Magazine St., and ending after turning river-bound on Jackson Ave.

Fri, March 15

Molly’s at the Market Irish Parade – 6:00 p.m.

Jim Monaghan’s parade rolls Friday (March 11) at 6:30 p.m. The parade takes its leave from Molly’s at the Market (1107 Decatur. St.), then the route will lead marchers down Decatur Street to take a right on Bienville Street, then take a right on Dauphine Street to loop past Erin Rose (811 Conti St.). They’ll march down Bourbon then finally take a right on Gov. Nicholls St. to return to Molly’s.

Sat, March 16

Parasol’s Block Party 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.

3rd and Constance 10am to 8pm. Music, green beer, food and surprises. The start of the block parties on the day of the Irish Channel Parade.

Tracy’s Block Party 11 a.m. – ’til

Annual celebration in the Irish Channel – 2604 Magazine Street.  They are the party at the end of the Irish Channel Parade
Irish Channel Parade – 1:00 p.m.

The parade follows Noon Mass at St. Mary’s Assumption Church, and marches from Magazine St. to Jackson Ave., to St. Charles Ave., to Louisiana Ave., to Magazine St., and ending after turning river-bound on Jackson Ave.

Sun, March 17

Downtown Irish Club Parade – 6:00 p.m.

The annual downtown St. Patrick’s Day parade begins on the corner of Burgundy and Piety in the Bywater, proceeds up Royal, across Esplanade to Decatur, up Canal to Bourbon. The parade makes several “pit stops” on its way to Bourbon St
St. Patrick’s Day Parade on Metairie Rd. – 12 Noon

The annual Metairie Road St. Patrick’s Day parade will take place at noon in front of Rummel High School on Severn Avenue, goes down Severn to Metairie Road, then Metairie Road to the parish line.

Sat, March 23

Italian-American St.Joseph’s Parade – 6 p.m.

The floats and Maids will start the parade at Canal Street and Charters at 6:00 p.m; the marchers will then follow. The only difference between the route for the floats and Maids and the route for the marchers is that when the floats and Maids turn onto St. Ann, they will proceed to Decatur Street and back to the Hilton Hotel instead of turning onto Royal Street like the marchers.

Sun, March 24

Louisiana Irish-Italian Parade (Metairie) – 12 Noon

The Louisiana Irish-Italian Parade will roll at 12:00 noon, onVeterans Highway in Metairie.

Sat, April 6

Irish-Italian/Islenos Parade

The parade starts at 12noon along the W. Judge Perez route in Chalmette. It consists of 53+ floats, 35+marching groups 1,500+ members and 350,000 pounds of produce.

89th Pirate’s Alley Art show April 6, 7

Apr 6- Apr 7
What:  an art event featuring exciting artwork by regional artists ,plus an opening parade, food and beverages for purchase, and painting demonstrations by some members of the association.

Visit noartassoc.org, or contact Wanda at noartassoc@yahoo.com for a prospectus, if you want to be an artist- participant.